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“We don’t just want to take people in for the night and kick them out in the morning,” Miller said. “That means we have to provide services to them as soon as they walk in; we have to make sure we engage them.” The decision to cut transitional housing was expected after the army was among several Hillsborough nonprofit groups hit by the loss of $800,000 in federal funding in May. The accommodation was intended to keep at-risk populations from becoming homeless until they find a permanent home. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development now favors programs that put homeless people in permanent housing and then provides them with the social services they need. The army has already scaled down its transitional housing and will find permanent places for the final nine people still in the program, Miller said. In some ways, the group is still in transition after its decision to end 40 years as the county’s probation services provider in 2015. That came after the army lost its Pinellas County contract because of concerns that 12 percent of probationer fees were going to the charity’s national organization. interviewThe army’s administrative building on Florida Avenue still includes cashier desks where convicted felons turned up to pay fees. Classrooms where probationers received counseling have been repurposed for homeless people trying to earn GEDs.

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vocation

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